Irish Red and White Setter

Irish Red and White Setter
Irish Red and White Setter pictures
Irish Red and White Setter suitability

In my own words

 

Oh, hello there! What’s your name? Do you want to be friends? I love making new friends – it’s just such good fun meeting new people! Not just people, actually. Other dogs, cats and even smaller pets can all be fun companions for me. You don’t need to worry about me being shy when you have visitors, I’ll welcome them with open paws! Just don’t expect me to be very good at watching over you and your home – I’m afraid I find it a bit hard to tell intruders apart from potential new playmates!

One of my favourite things to do with new friends is go out for some exercise in the countryside. Do you fancy it? I can show you how good I am at hunting down birds and chasing the local wildlife! Come on, it’ll be great fun. I’ll get my lead.

 

My ideal owner(s)

 

Country folk

People who like long walks

People who like country pursuits

People who have a sociable lifestyle

Families

 

What they say about me

 

Playful

Energetic

Affectionate and loving

Loves to be active

Intelligent

 

Please read on to find out more about me, and whether I’ll be someone you’ll be happy to live with for the next 15 years!

 

Is this Irish Red and White Setter for you?

Test your knowledge about the Irish Red and White Setter

Information essential about the Irish Red and White Setter

 

Kennel Club Group:

Gundog

Size:

Large: Weight Male 50 – 75 lb (23 – 34 kg) Female 50 – 70 lb (23 – 32 kg)

Height Male 24 – 26” (61 – 66 cm) Female 22.5 – 24” (57 – 61 cm)

 

Popularity:

The Irish Red and White Setter came very close to extinction in the early 1900s. Thanks to enthusiastic and caring breeders, the Irish Red and White Setter had a revival in the 1970s but it is still considered to be a rare breed and is difficult to get hold of. For this reason, the Irish Red and White Setter is generally not considered to be a popular breed

Breed History:

 

The Irish Red and White Setter originates from 17th century Ireland, where the breed was developed to be pointing bird dogs. The original Irish Setter was mostly red or red and white, but towards the end of the 19th Century the solid red setter gained popularity became the preferred colour of the Irish Setters. As a result, the Irish Red and White Setter very nearly became extinct. Thankfully, a Northern Irish clergyman called Noble Huston was enthusiastic about the breed and saved it from the brink of extinction in the 1920s, although only a small number of Irish Red and White Setters remained, despite his efforts.

It wasn’t until 1970 that a full revival of the rare Irish Red and White Setter was planned and their numbers began to slowly but steadily increase. A decade later, the Irish red and White Setter was imported to the United Kingdom, where the breed was developed as a show dog rather than a working dog.

The breed is now recognised by most Kennel Clubs throughout the world and is no longer threatened by extinction.

 

Character:

 

Friendly, affectionate and loving, your Irish Red and White Setter is a sociable dog that gets on well with everyone from children and adults to dogs and other pets. They are truly devoted to their owners and unafraid of strangers. They’ll greet your visitors with a happy and cheerful welcome, so train them from an early age not to jump on people. Your Irish Setter’s lovable and trusting nature means that he isn’t a good watch or guard dog as he has no protection instincts. There are two types of Irish Red and White Setter, so it’s important to pick the right line for you and your lifestyle. The first is the field type – a hard working dog bred for hunting and field trail work, they tend to be smaller and have shorter coats. The bench type was bred for the show ring – they have a longer coat and have a little less energy than the field type dogs. Whether your Irish Red and White Setter is a bench or field type, be prepared to have a swift, high spirited, energetic dog on your hands. They need daily exercise in order to keep them content and to avoid them becoming highly strung or destructive. A natural hunting dog, your Irish Red and White Setter will relish running around open fields and chasing the wildlife, so a country home is well suited to the breed.

 

Temperament:

 

Your Irish Red and White Setter is a highly intelligent dog who loves to keep you happy, making him a fairly easy dog to train. The temperament of the Irish Red and White Setter has been known to vary widely, even within the same litter. When choosing a puppy, make sure you look for characteristics of the type of dog you would like. Meeker owners should choose a submissive dog, while more experienced and confident owners may do well with a more dominant dog, providing they can show them an air of authority. Your Irish Red and White Setter can be sensitive to the tone of your voice, so speak calmly to ensure he doesn’t become agitated or upset during training sessions.

 

Conformation:

 

Whilst being strong and powerful, the Irish Red and White Setter is not a stocky looking dog and has an athletic, elegant look. The head should be broad and in proportion to the body with a good stop, while the skull is slightly dome and the muzzle is square. The ears should be set on a level line with the eyes, which are hazel or dark brown, and lie close the head. The strong jaw forms a scissor bite. A long and muscular neck is slightly arched and meets well laid back shoulders. The chest is deep and the ribs are well sprung. The hindquarters are strong and give the Irish Red and White Setter speed and power. The Irish Red and White Setter has a strong tail at the base, which tapers to a point. The feet should be close knit and well-feathered between the toes. The Irish Red Setter has a fine, soft, slightly wavy coat.

 

Colour:

 

The Irish Red and White Setter’s coat is parti-coloured, meaning it has a white base colour with solid patches of red. Mottling around the face, feet and foreleg may also be present.

 

Training:

 

In order for training your Irish Red and White Setter to go smoothly, it’s is important that your dog is calm and content. Therefore, there are two key factors to implement into your training technique. The first is to ensure your Irish Red and White Setter is well exercised; this will burn up some of his abundant energy and create a calmer, happier dog that is more likely to be easy to work with during a training session. The second point is to show your Irish Red and White Setter that you are in control by giving him firm but fair handling and being consistent and confident around him at all times. If these two requirements are not met, your Irish Red and White setter can become a handful, however, they are intelligent dogs and can be very well trained with the right methods.

 

Care:

 

The Irish Red and White Setter’s long and silky coat doesn’t need a huge amount of grooming. A daily brush and bathing only when necessary is all that is needed to make sure his coat remains healthy and knot free. He sheds an average amount of hair.

 

Health:

 

The Irish Red and White Setter is prone to Von Willebrand’s Disease, a genetic disease which creates a failure of the blood to clot over a wound, meaning that affected dogs can actually bleed to death if badly cut or wounded. In addition, they are susceptible to Posterior Polar cataract, a minor form of cataract that does not usually lead to blindness. The Irish Red and White Setter can also be prone to Canine Leucocyte Adhesion Deficiency; a fatal auto immune disease. Hip dysplasia can also occur and owners should ensure their Irish Red and White Setter is exercised well and fed a healthy diet in order to avoid bloat. The average life expectancy of a healthy Irish Red and White Setter is between 11 and 15 years.

 

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Advice on choosing your breed »

Find an animal shelter or rescue home where a Irish Red and White Setter is waiting for a new home »

The following grid gives a fast track review which covers all breeds. You can apply it to help you decide if an Irish Red and White Setter is suitable for you, the environment where you live, your personality and your lifestyle. On the grid, 1 = strongly disagree, and 5 = strongly agree. For example, if you are looking for a dog that is suitable to take on jogs, look down the list under ‘activities’ and you will see that Irish Red and White Setters are perfect jogging companions, scoring 5. If you are looking for a dog that would make a good watch dog, look under ‘role and suitability’ and you’ll see an Irish Red and white Setter would be a poor choice, scoring just 1. You might like to save or print off this section and keep it for reference while you check some other breeds before making your choice

Be the first to rate this breed »

Noahs Breed Rating | Community Breed Rating

Activities
Good jogging companion5/5
Good walking companion5/5
Likes water/swimming5/5
Likes learning new tricks3/5
Likes to hunt5/5
Likes to fetch5/5
Good gundog/retriever5/5
Behaviour
Barks a lot2/5
Gets easily jealous1/5
Protective1/5
Aggressive1/5
Timid2/5
Friendly with strangers5/5
Cost
Expensive to insure3/5
Expensive to feed3/5
Environment
Happy to sleep outside3/5
Prefers countryside5/5
Suits urban environment3/5
Prefers temperate climate5/5
Prefers hot climate3/5
Prefers cold climate4/5
Grooming
Moults a lot3/5
Hypoallergenic2/5
Requires lots of grooming2/5
Role and Suitability
Ideal for elderly3/5
Ideal for singles3/5
Ideal for couples with no children4/5
Ideal for family with children5/5
Good watch dog1/5
Good guard dog1/5
Sociability
Good with other pets5/5
Good with other dogs5/5
Time and Energy
Happy being left alone for 4hrs3/5
Happy being left alone for 2hrs4/5
Requires lots of exercise4/5
Training and Obedience
Good for first time owners3/5
Good for experienced owners4/5
Good recall3/5
Easy to train4/5
Activities
Good jogging companion0/5
Good walking companion0/5
Likes water/swimming0/5
Likes learning new tricks0/5
Likes to hunt0/5
Likes to fetch0/5
Good gundog/retriever0/5
Behaviour
Barks a lot0/5
Gets easily jealous0/5
Protective0/5
Aggressive0/5
Timid0/5
Friendly with strangers0/5
Cost
Expensive to insure0/5
Expensive to feed0/5
Environment
Happy to sleep outside0/5
Prefers countryside0/5
Suits urban environment0/5
Prefers temperate climate0/5
Prefers hot climate0/5
Prefers cold climate0/5
Grooming
Moults a lot0/5
Hypoallergenic0/5
Requires lots of grooming0/5
Role and Suitability
Ideal for elderly0/5
Ideal for singles0/5
Ideal for couples with no children0/5
Ideal for family with children0/5
Good watch dog0/5
Good guard dog0/5
Sociability
Good with other pets0/5
Good with other dogs0/5
Time and Energy
Happy being left alone for 4hrs0/5
Happy being left alone for 2hrs0/5
Requires lots of exercise0/5
Training and Obedience
Good for first time owners0/5
Good for experienced owners0/5
Good recall0/5
Easy to train0/5

*PLEASE NOTE: All our breed profiles are general, and all dogs are individuals. Always talk to the breeders and meet the owners you are buying from. Try to meet the dog and its parents if it is a puppy in their home environment.

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